Archive for the ‘Quotes’ Category

Quote of the Day

The skeptic does not mean him who doubts, but him who investigates or researches, as opposed to him who asserts and thinks he has found.

— Miguel de Unamuno y Jugo

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Quote f the Day

People who are brutally honest get more satisfaction out of the brutality than out of the honesty.

— Richard J. Needham

Quote of the Day

Reserve your right to think, for even to think wrongly is better than not to think at all.

— Hypatia of Alexandria

Quote of the Day

“Men talk to women so they can have sex with them, and women have sex with men so that men will talk to them.”

– Nelson Demille (The Lion’s Game)

Quote of the Day

Religion, mysticism and magic all spring from the same basic “feeling” about the universe: a sudden feeling of meaning, which human beings sometimes “pick up” accidentally, as your radio might pick up some unknown station. Poets feel that we are cut off from meaning by a thick, lead wall, and that sometimes for no reason we can understand the wall seems to vanish and we are suddenly overwhelmed with a sense of the infinite interestingness of things.

— Colin Wilson

Quote of the Day

Travel changes you. As you move through this life and this world you change things slightly, you leave marks behind, however small. And in return, life — and travel — leaves marks on you. Most of the time, those marks — on your body or on your heart — are beautiful. Often, though, they hurt.

— Anthony Bourdain

Quote of the Day

Don’t bother just to be better than your contemporaries or predecessors. Try to be better than yourself.

— William Faulkner

Quote of the Day

While it is well enough to leave footprints on the sands of time, it is even more important to make sure they point in a commendable direction.

— James Branch Cabell

Quote of the Day

When walking in open territory, bother no one. If someone bothers you, ask him to stop. If he does not stop, destroy him.

— Anton LaVey

Quote of the Day

People who are eccentric enough to be quite seriously virtuous understand each other everywhere, discover each other easily, and form a silent opposition to the ruling immorality that happens to pass for morality.

— Karl Wilhelm Friedrich Schlegel