Archive for February, 2017|Monthly archive page

Quote of the Day

I think they’ve [Labour Government] made the biggest financial mess that any government’s ever made in this country for a very long time, and Socialist governments traditionally do make a financial mess. They always run out of other people’s money. It’s quite a characteristic of them. They then start to nationalise everything, and people just do not like more and more nationalisation, and they’re now trying to control everything by other means. They’re progressively reducing the choice available to ordinary people.

— Margaret Thatcher

Advertisements

Quote of the Day

From the fact that people are very different it follows that, if we treat them equally, the result must be inequality in their actual position, and that the only way to place them in an equal position would be to treat them differently. Equality before the law and material equality are therefore not only different but are in conflict with each other; and we can achieve either one or the other, but not both at the same time.

— Friedrich August von Hayek

Quote of the Day

Then, while trying to get you to accept the ridiculous notion that every kind of “selfishness,” even just making money in the private sector (earning a living and growing a nest egg) is morally vicious, they also try to get you to accept the even more absurd idea that the accumulating of political power by government employees and politicians (and their legal machinations to steal or control the property of others) is morally good. This is sold along with an implicit demand that their professed concern for “others” be accepted without question at face value, together with an implicit threat: “Don’t you DARE point out that grasping for and accumulating political power definitely IS a kind of ‘selfishness,’ only this time it’s the bad kind, the vicious taking-unwilling-advantage kind, the kind that’s the hallmark of criminals, politicians, their intellectual excuse-makers and other aggressive parasites.

— Rick Graber

Quote of the Day

So long as [men] hold the tribal notion that the individual is sacrificial
fodder for the collective, that some men have the right to rule others by force, and that some (any) alleged ‘good’ can justify it — there can be no peace within a nation and no peace among nations.

— Ayn Rand

Quote of the Day

Just as any moron can destroy a priceless Ming vase, so the shallow and ill-educated people who run our schools can undermine and destroy from within a great civilization that took centuries of dedicated effort to create and maintain.

— Thomas Sowell

Quote of the Day

Free enterprise capitalism exists only when people in the private sector are free to pursue their own interests without direction from government. When politicians start passing laws to tell them what to do, or bureaucrats start issuing edicts to tell them what to do, it is no longer capitalism; it’s fascism.

— Rick Gaber

Quote of the Day

Always remember the difference between economic power and political power: You can refuse to hire someone’s services or buy his products in the private sector and go somewhere else instead. In the public sector, though, if you refuse to accept a politician’s or bureaucrat’s product or services you go to jail.

Ultimately, after all, all regulations are observed and all taxes are paid at gunpoint. I believe those few who can’t even see that have been short-sighted sheep, and I suggest they learn how to think conceptually, develop consistency and grasp principles soon.

— Rick Graber

Quote of the Day

In fact, the big corporations who understand the regulatory game can actually benefit from it. They can lobby for expensive regulations only the largest corporations can afford, effectively keeping upstarts and competitors at bay.

— Radley Balko

QUote of the Day

The power to determine the quantity of money… is too important, too pervasive, to be exercised by a few people, however public-spirited, if there is any feasible alternative. There is no need for such arbitrary power… Any system which gives so much power and so much discretion to a few men, [so] that mistakes – excusable or not – can have such far reaching effects, is a bad system. It is a bad system to believers in freedom just because it gives a few men such power without any effective check by the body politic – this is the key political argument against an independent central bank.

— Milton Friedman